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Eco-Books

Check out these sites to learn even more about the topics listed below.

Check out these books to learn even more about Wildlife, Science, Nature and Energy.

  • Climate Change
  • Earth Day
  • Energy
  • Land Use
  • The North
  • Waste
  • Water
  • Wildlife

Primary

The ABC’s of Continents
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009.
Some of the topics covered in this book are bodies of water, the equator, poles, and hemispheres, latitude and longitude, urban and rural areas, landforms, extreme continents, and many more. This book certainly shows a different and fun way to study this important curriculum topic!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The ABC’s of the Environment
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009.
Global warming, greenhouse gases, melting mountains, habitat loss, pollution, floods, deforestation, endangered animals, and holes in the ozone are just some environmental problems highlighted in this book. Solutions such as e-cycling, the three Rs, alternative power sources, zero-carbon economy, composting, and reducing our energy footprints are a few of the possible solutions presented in this new book by Crabtree Publishing.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The Antarctic Habitat
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
In The Antarctic Habitat, children will find a detailed description of the freezing, snow- and ice-covered continent of Antarctica. Stunning photographs and easy-to-understand text teach children about the different species of birds, seals, and whales that live in the freezing Southern Ocean that surrounds Antarctica. Topics include:

  • the extreme weather conditions in Antarctica
  • icebergs and glaciers
  • how animals survive in the freezing Southern Ocean

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

The Polar Bear’s Home: A Story about Global Warming
By Lara Bergen, 2009.
Come along on an Arctic adventure with a little girl and her father and learn all about polar bears! This 8 x 8 storybook shows how global warming affects two baby polar bear cubs and their family. Includes tips for kids on what they can do to help slow down global warming.

What are Earth’s biomes?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009.
Earth has six major types of environments with different climates and containing complex communities of plants and animals that have adapted to the special conditions in each. These types of environments are called biomes. The main biomes are: freshwater, marine, desert, forest, tundra, and grassland. They are broken down into seventeen sub-categories. This easy-to-understand book explains this important subject and stresses the importance of conserving our precious biomes and the life forms that inhabit each one.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

World About Us: The Greenhouse Effect
By Michael Bright, 1991.
What is Global Warming? Find out! And discover some actions you can take to help keep the 'World About Us' healthy for the future. Lots of colourful pictures.

Junior

Catastrophic Weather
By Sarah Levete, 2010.
Climate influences the features of the landscape, what farmers can grow, where people live, and the type of houses they build. But what happens when the climate changes abruptly and dramatically, not as part of a natural process of change but because of human activity? The result is more frequent and stronger extreme weather events such as heat waves, storms, torrential rain, raging winds, and hurricanes. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of catastrophic weather and asks the question: Are we prepared to adapt our lifestyles to prevent climate change from spiralling out of control?

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

DK Eyewitness Books: “Climate Change”
B John Woodward, 2008.
An in-depth look at the phenomenon of global warming--what’s causing it, what it might lead to, and what we can do to fight back.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-8; Ages 8-14)

DK Eyewitness Books: “Earth Matters”
By DK Publishing, 2008.
With a biome-by-biome structure that mirrors Mother Nature’s own design, Our Earth Matters is a celebration of our fragile Earth, a warning to protect it, and an inspiring source book full of ideas for making a positive change.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-8; Ages 8-14)

The Down to Earth Guide to Global Warming
By Laurie David & Cambria Gordon, 2007.
Written for ages 8 and up, The Down-to-Earth Guide to Global Warming by Laurie David and Cambria Gordon, is a comprehensive resource young readers can look to for understanding the science behind why global warming happens and how we can work together to stop it. Irreverent and entertaining, and packed with essential facts and suggestions on how kids can help combat global warming in their homes, schools, and communities, Down-to-Earth offers a message of hope.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-7; Ages 8-12)

E is for Environment
By Ian James Corlett, 2011
Geared toward children ten and younger, and designed to be read out loud and discussed as a family, E is for Environment covers a wide range of eco-friendly messages, including using filtered water instead of buying bottled water, the importance of buying “fair trade” products, how to conserve water while brushing your teeth and watering the lawn, the joys of starting a garden, the benefits of carpooling, and so much more.  Each story is also accompanied by a delightful illustration, discussion questions, and tips for conserving energy & natural resources.

Environmental Disaster Alert!
By Paul Challen, 2004.
Humans are sometimes to blame for catastrophic influences on the world’s air, water, soil, and natural resources. Environmental Disaster Alert! probes the causes and effects of greenhouse gases, acid rain, oil spills, air pollution, and other human-caused disasters. Topics include:

  • the human activities that are causing the destruction of the ozone layer, and the results of this damage
  • ways that organizations such as Greenpeace and Pollution Probe try to prevent environmental disasters
  • methods used to recover from environmental disasters, such as re-planting forests, re-stocking formerly contaminated lakes, and the clean-up of chemical spills
  • the effects of environmental disasters on our natural resources, animals, plants, and humans
  • ways that scientists predict environmental disasters, and potential disasters that have been avoided as a result

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Exploring Weather
By Ed Catherall, 1990.
Find out about weather patterns around the world. Do cool activities and experiments. Discover the answers to questions like: How does frost form? What is a jet-stream? and How are rainbows made?

Global Warming
By Alexander Peckham, 1991.
Explore:

  • Causes of global warming
  • How climate change will affect the Earth
  • Things you can do about global warming

Global Warming Alert!
By Richard Cheel, 2007.
The Earth’s average temperature is rising and scientists are studying the effects of this change with alarm. Sea levels around the world are changing, the number of severe storms and hurricanes each year is increasing, and the landscape is changing due to rapid desertification and crop loss. Written by an Earth scientist, Global Warming Alert! is a thoughtful look at how the way we live is affecting the planet. Topics include:

  • the Greenhouse Effect — how greenhouse gases are produced and trapped in the Earth’s atmosphere by burning fossil fuels in our homes and automobiles
  • climate change and changes in long term weather patterns
  • how animal species are endangered by climate change
  • drowning islands and the loss of coastal living space
  • the history of Earth’s climate and the climate system
  • what we can do to reverse climate change

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Global Warming: Assessing the Greenhouse Threat
By Laurence Pringle, 1990.
This book is a good introduction to one of the 'hottest' environmental issues.
Discover:

  • Why the Earth's climate is getting warmer
  • Impacts that have already started to happen and what scientists think will happen as the Earth gets warmer
  • What you can do to get ready for global warming and how you can help slow it down

The Science Book of Weather Children’s Nonfiction
By Neil Ardley, 1992.
Do you know how clouds form? Find out by making one appear in a bottle. Using things from around your home and following the simple instructions, you can learn all about the forces that shape weather.

Weather and Climate – Also available in French: Le Temps et le Climat
By Barbara Taylor, 1993.
Learn all about weather and weather patterns around the world. Lots of ideas for cool weather projects like making your own thermometer or building a model to see how the seasons work.

Weather and Climate
By Theodore Rowland-Entwistle, 1992.
Jam packed with info on climate and weather:

  • The difference between weather and climate
  • Forecasting the weather
  • Climates around the world
  • What brings seasons
  • Climate and plants
  • How people change climate and much, much more

Intermediate

Global Warming
By Ron Fridell, 2002
Describes several different theories on the causes and solutions of global warming, including a brief history of the Earth’s temperature ranges, scientists’ predictions for the future, and the governments’ reactions.

Primary

Earth Day
By Molly Aloian
An annual celebration of awareness, Earth Day is designed to encourage people to take part in the preservation of their environment. Come inside Earth Day to learn the history of the event, the celebrations, and how you can get involved.

(Reading Level: K-2; Ages 4-7)

Easy to Be Green: Simple Activities You Can Do to Save the Earth
By Ellie O’Ryan, 2009.
Everyone’s talking about the environment these days, especially kids. But what can kids do? A lot! This book is filled with cool coloring pages, Earth-saving tips, fun facts, and easy activities kids can do to help the environment. It’s just what kids need to be green all by themselves!

Go Green Canada
By Jeff Sinclair, 2008.
Want to put the freeze on global warming? Want to be in the know zone about the ozone? Reduce the heat or the air-conditioning, reuse an old pencil stub and recycle your brain cells! It’s time to tackle these fun games and quizzes and learn how you can help the environment!

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-7; Ages 7 to 12)

How Green Are You?
Bellamy, D.
Clarkson N. Potter Inc., New York: 1991.
Provides information and projects about ecology and environmental concerns that teach children and their families how to conserve energy, protect wildlife, and reduce pollution.

Nature in Danger: Environmental Facts and Experiments
By Rosie Harlow, 2002.
Examining the world's different habitats, how plants and animals adapt to their environments, and how these ecosystems remain in balance, this activity-based book looks at how pollution, farming, and deforestation can cause damage. "How Can I Help?" boxes give plenty of practical, fun suggestions for improving our environment.

Our Earth: How kids are saving the planet
By Janet Wilson, 2010.
Young people are doing amazing things for the planet. Here are true stories of kids living around the world who had an idea. They started something small that turned into something big. Read about ways that you can make a difference, like William Kamkwamba in Malawi who used the wind to change the life in his village. Or Kruti Parekh from India who makes magic with recycling. There is Janine Liclare in Costa Rica who is saving the rainforest and its animals, and Ryan Hreljic from Canada who is building wells to bring people water. Sam Levin’s school vegetable gardens are connecting kids with their food. All of them are helping our planet, and you can too.

(Reading Level: Grades 2-8; Ages 7-12)

Rainforests: An Activity Guide for Ages 6-9
By Nancy F. Castaldo, 2003.
After several chapters devoted to describing the tropical rainforest, the author takes readers on a round-the-world tour, including a visit to the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest. The activities are varied and interesting, ranging from science projects to crafts to recipes; however, many require adult assistance.

Your Local Environment
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
Wherever you live, you share your environment with other people, plants, and animals. Your Local Environment looks at the importance of caring for the world around you, making it a better place for people, plants, and animals.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Junior

50 Simple Things Kids Can Do to Save the Earth
By The EarthWorks Group
This valuable and entertaining book shows children how specific elements of their environment--like a light switch or a toilet--are connected to the rest of the world. Clear, practical tips show kids how they can conserve energy, recycle waste, and take on important environmental projects.

A Child's Introduction to the Environment: The Air, Earth, and Sea Around Us- Plus
Experiments, Projects, and Activities YOU Can Do to Help Our Planet!
By Michael Driscoll, Dennis Driscoll, 2008
A Child's Introduction to the Environment provides an entertaining and instructive tour of the Earth's varied environments, along with activities and materials to encourage young environmentalists. Kids aged 9-12 and their parents will appreciate this upbeat yet clear-eyed, interactive look at our magnificent planet and how we can safeguard it. Exploring in turn the water, land, and air around us, the book looks at the wide variety of environmental regions of the world (deserts, forests, cities, farms, ice caps, oceans) as well as the atmosphere, weather, energy sources, plants, and animals of each area. Short features throughout offer fun facts, projects, and experiments that kids can do with parents or on their own. And a special packet inside the front cover contains a reusable lunch sack, peel-off stickers with messages such as "TURN OFF THE LIGHTS," "RECYCLE," and "UNPLUG," and a special poster from the NRDC. Charming original watercolor illustrations throughout are perfectly paired with an accessible text by a father-and-son team of writers (Dad is a meteorologist). And it is all printed on recycled material, of course!

Building a Green Community
By Ellen Rodger, 2008.
“Green living” means changing the way we live and use resources so that the environment is able to produce indefinitely the things we need to live. Building a Green Community walks young readers through a model community identifying “green living” practices at work, at home, on our highways, and at the store. This fascinating book also includes case studies of “green” communities around the world.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Carbon Footprint – On the Move: Green Transportation
By Kathy Furgang & Adam Furgang, 2009.
This book suggests things people can do while getting from place to place to reduce the greenhouse gases which affect the rate of global warming.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-8; Ages 9-13)

Carbon Footprint – Reducing Your Carbon Footprint at School
By Jeanne Nagle, 2008.
This title in the Your Carbon Footprint series discusses practical tips and strategies for students who want to reduce the impact of their schools on the environment. The relevant science is explained, but the real focus is on hands-on activities and practices that will help individuals make a difference.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-7; Ages 8-12)

Carbon Footprint – Reducing Your Carbon Footprint in the Kitchen
By Linley Erin Hall, 2008.
Provides advice on how to eat in an environmentally conscious way, from eating sustainably and locally, to reusing shopping bags and saving energy while cooking.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-7; Ages 9-12)

Carbon Footprint – Reducing Your Carbon Footprint on Vacation
By Greg Roza, 2009.
This book suggests things people can do on vacation to reduce production of greenhouse gases which affects the rate of global warming.

(Reading Level: Gr.4-8; Ages 9-13)

Carbon Footprint – Smart Shopping: Shopping Green
By Jeanne Nagle, 2008.
The era-defining challenge for the current youth generation is global warming and resulting climate change. Human beings must find a way to dramatically reduce their per capita carbon emissions if catastrophic climate change is to be slowed or averted. Individuals can make a big difference over time with the small consumer choices they make every day. This book offers a wealth of tips for how to shop both smart and green and reduce your carbon footprint upon the increasingly fragile environment.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-8; Ages 10-13)

Earth Book for Kids: Activities to Help Heal the Environment
By Linda Schwartz , 1990
Filled with ideas for arts and crafts projects, experiments, and experiences that encourage children to enjoy and heal the environment, this book covers acid rain, endangered wildlife, pesticides, energy, recycling, pollution, landfills, rain forests, water conservation, and related topics.

Environmental Activist
By Carrie Gleason, 2009.
Environmental activists are concerned for the well being of the environment, including all people, plants, and animals. This wonderfully informative title shows how environmentalists work to preserve and improve the natural environment and how young environmentalists can become positive activists themselves. Readers will learn what actions they can take to make the world a better place to live in.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Exploring the Oceans: Science Activities for Kids
By Anthony D. Fredericks, Illustrated by Shawn Berlute-Shea, 1998.
Activities, projects, and experiments in this book help children realize how critical the oceans are to our planet. Most activities do not require access to the sea.
Kids Book List
General Nature/ Environment
AGES 4-8

Global Citizen – Improving Quality of Life
By Susan Watson, 2004.
Explores how the quality of life varies in different parts of the world and what can be done to help meet people’s basic needs, both through government action and the efforts of individual citizens.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4+; Ages 9+)

Global Citizen – Living Sustainably
By Susan Watson, 2003.
Explores ways that individuals and communities can work to improve people’s quality of life without overusing Earth’s scarce resources, such as recycling, using alternative energy sources, and conserving water.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4+; Ages 9+)

How to Reduce your Carbon Footprint
By Amanda Bishop
Emission of harmful greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide is posing a grave challenge to nature. The problem of global warming needs to be addressed as soon as possible. How to Reduce your Carbon Footprint clearly explains what an individual’s carbon footprint is and what we all can do to make a difference. Special case studies show how these ideas are currently being put into practice around the world.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Making a Difference: The Changing the World Handbook
By Ali Cronin, 2009.
Children are the future, so let’s give them the tools to make the right decisions for a better tomorrow. Making a Difference offers solutions for young readers to make the world a better place for future generations. Practical advice and an inviting design make this title an obvious choice for altruistic youngsters.

(Reading Level: Gr. 5; Ages 9-10)

Nature Smart
By Joe Rhatigan, 2004.
Half science lesson, half hands-on project making, this book gives children the opportunity to learn through investigation. In addition, many pages are devoted to explaining, in easily understood language, the workings of nature such as the water cycle, why flowers have colours and varying shapes, and so on.

Protect Nature
By Kay Barnham, 2007.
Protecting natural habitats, animals, and plants from being harmed or destroyed is essential to our planet's survival. This new book explores how the everyday actions of humans can harm nature, from the pollution created by the fuel we use and the garbage we throw away, to the habitats that are destroyed to make way for roads and cities. Ideas for protecting nature at home, at school, and on vacation encourage children to take an active part in preserving and caring for our environment.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Reducing Your Footprint: Farming, Cooking, and Eating for a Healthy Planet
By Ellen Rodger, 2010.
Reducing Your Foodprint teaches children that what they eat and how they eat is important to the environment. Most of the food served in restaurants and stocked on grocery store shelves travels many thousands of miles by airplane and truck. The further food travels, the more harm to the environment. This enlightening new book explains how to eat locally and responsibly. Special case study sections highlight how others have reduced both their carbon foodprints and footprints just by making changes in their diets.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Rescue Mission Planet Earth; A Children's Edition of Agenda 21
United Nations., Kingfisher Books, London: 1994.
In an anthology of stories, poems, paintings, photographs, interviews, case studies, and drawings, children from around the world share their ideas on how to implement the proposals set forth in Agenda 21, the document that resulted from the 1992 Earth Summit.

The Science of the Environment
By Patricia Miller-Schroeder, 2001.
This simple science manual explores the various climates of deserts, forests, grasslands, steppes, and savannas, and introduces children to the concepts of overpopulation, recycling, and endangered habitats. Also included are suggestions for everyday ways to preserve and protect the environment.

You Are the Earth: Know the Planet So You Can Make it Better!
By David Suzuki and Kathy Vanderlinden, 2002.
After devoting a chapter to each of life's necessities, including air, water, and soil, the authors conclude with a look at social and environmental initiatives by young people and ten consciousness-raising activities that range from science projects to storytelling. Folktales from several traditions are interspersed throughout.

Intermediate

A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids: Understanding Climate Change and What You Can Do About It
By Julie Hall, 2007
Kids, parents, and teachers will find the very latest information about the causes and effects of climate change, how people are working to reduce it, and ways kids and their families and schools can join the fight. A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids teaches and inspires through clear and accessible writing, engaging illustrations, hands-on activities, cool and hot facts, eco-hero features, and a hopeful and empowering message to get kids involved in confronting global warming and developing their best selves through such work. A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids is suitable for home and classroom use. It meets national science and social studies curriculum standards. Additional teacher resources are available.

Al Gore: A Wake-Up Call to Global Warming
By Dale Anderson, 2009.
Politician Al Gore has lent both his voice and his political influence in the fight against global warming. His work and creative energy have earned him numerous forms of public recognition, most notably the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

(Reading Level: Gr. 6; Ages 10-11)

Building Green Places: Careers in Planning, Designing, and Building
By Ruth Owen, 2009.
Building Green Places takes a ‘green’ look at careers in planning, designing, and building energy-efficient facilities in which to live, work, and play. It also includes the development of communities built in a way that will complement and enhance Earth’s ecosystems.

(Reading Level: Gr. 7-8; Ages 11-13)

David Suzuki: Doing Battle with Climate Change
By Suzy Gazlay, 2009.
David Suzuki is a prominent environmental activist. Throughout his adult life, he has been the creative force behind numerous television shows on science and the environment. He has used his voice to advocate for the environment and to take to task political leaders whose action and inaction have been part of the problem behind the global warming crisis.

(Reading Level: Gr. 5-6; Ages 9-11)

Ed Begley Jr.: Living Green
By Robert Grayson, 2009.
Ed Begley, Jr. is a Hollywood actor, who inspires, entertains, and motivates a new generation of environmental activists, fans, and consumers with his all-encompassing green lifestyle. Whether he is promoting his own line of green products, lending his voice to further environmental awareness and action, or “walking the walk” of the life he touts in his own solar-powered home, the star of Living with Ed is constantly on the lookout for ways to live more green - and get others onboard in the process.

(Reading Level Gr. 6; Ages 10-11)

Growing and Eating Green: Careers in Farming, Producing, and Marketing Food
By Ruth Owen, 2009.
Come inside for a fresh look at careers in ‘green’ food, from planting to cultivation, and merchandising to selling. In addition to the “greening” of conventional methods of food production, this book examines careers in alternative energy, equipment, packaging, and delivery systems.

(Reading Level: Gr. 7-8; Ages 11-13)

John Muir: Protecting and Preserving the Environment
By Henry Elliot, 2009.
John Muir spoke, wrote, and lived the wilderness, including taking President Theodore Roosevelt on an overnight trip to the Yosemite Valley. This trip led to Roosevelt’s signing into law a bill that placed Yosemite under federal control as a national park. Because of this and his founding of the Sierra Club, John Muir is credited as one of the key shapers of the modern environmental movement.

(Reading Level: Gr. 6; Ages 10-11)

Learning Green: Careers in Education
By Suzy Gazlay, 2009.
Learning Green introduces readers to a wide range of careers in education that address conservation and environmentalism. These include teaching and promoting a ‘green’ curriculum in a public or private school setting. These subjects intersect with a vast assortment of professions, such as architecture, engineering, law, horticulture, forestry, biology, urban and regional planning, oceanography, geology, and geography.

(Reading Level: Gr. 7-8; Ages 11-13)

Managing Green Spaces: Careers in Wilderness and Wildlife Management
By Suzy Gazlay, 2009.
Managing Green Spaces introduces the many available jobs in wilderness and wildlife management. Potential careers include park-services jobs, trail designing, security and police work, and emergency services in case of fires, floods, and other natural disasters.

(Reading Level: Gr. 7-8; Ages 11-13)

Planet Earth: 25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself
By Kathleen Reilly, 2008
This title in the Projects You Can Build Yourself series combines explanations of science concepts and environmental issues with hands-on projects. Initial chapters offer basic facts about earth and life sciences, beginning with a discussion of what’s usually meant by the term the environment. Later chapters explore threats to the planet’s health in a survey of pollution and global warming. Throughout, terms appear in bold type and then are defined in frequent “Words to Know” boxes. Elementary and middle-school students will find the succinct overview of the facts very useful, and they’ll welcome the clearly presented projects, which range from a granola recipe that will teach them about native foods around the globe to handmade card games for multiple players. Extensive further readings and an eye-catching design filled with drawings complete a title that while educating kids about the environment steers them past despair with the reminder that every individual action helps: “Some changes are better than none.”

Rachel Carson: Fighting Pesticides and Other Chemical Pollutants
By Patricia Lantier, 2009.
Rachel Carson was a marine writer, biologist, and ecologist whose work inspired millions to take seriously the danger that human activity poses to the environment. She both revealed the wonders of the natural world and exposed the sinister threat to that world posed by DDT and other pesticides.

(Reading Level: Gr. 5-6; Ages 9-11)

Victor Wouk: The Father of the Hybrid Car
By Sean Callery, 2009.
In 1974, an inventor named Victor Wouk became a man who could be described as “ahead of his time.” He had developed a prototype for the hybrid, a car that would become the most credible and commercially successful alternative to gasoline-powered vehicles.

(Reading Level: Gr. 5-6; Ages 9-11)

Primary

A Look Inside Energy from Fossil Fuels
By Dale Rice (1983).
This book is all about fossil fuels. From how they are made, the discovery of fossil fuels, how we get them from the Earth, to the future of fossil fuels and other sources of energy.

Oil, Gas and Coal – Ages 4-8
By Jacqueline Dineen (1995).
From the "What About" series, learning about oil, natural gas and coal is made simple. Lots of great pictures.

Using Energy
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
Food and water give us energy to live, grow and work. Gas gives cars energy to move and electricity makes a light bulb glow. Using Energy looks at the different kinds of energy that people, machines and nature use.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Junior

A Look Inside Energy from Fossil Fuels
By Thomas Rybolt & Robert C. Mebane (1994).
Cool experiments that will help you learn more about the environment that can be done at home or school. Some of the exciting renewable energy project ideas you'll find include: discovering how much energy the sun produces; can electricity be made from sunlight; and can a fuel be made from plant material? Make sure you don't do any experiments without an adults help

Biomass: Fueling Change
By Niki Walker, 2006.
Did you know that some cars are run on fuel made from the oils from sunflowers and soybeans? Biomass: Fueling Change is an exciting new book that explores bioenergy, energy derived from organic matter, to produce heat, run cars, and generate electricity. Worldwide case studies and colourful photographs and illustrations will help children learn about the history of bioenergy and how the world is using this energy today. Topics include:

  • the history of bioenergy
  • various types of biomass available for energy use
  • the benefits of biofuels
  • burning biomass
  • the processes used to convert biomass to gas
  • using bioenergy today, and its limitations

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Energy – Sustainable World Series
By Rob Bowden, 2003.
Following an overview of our current dependency on fossil fuels and an explanation of the costs of using nonrenewable energy sources, Energy briefly introduces various forms of sustainable energy -- water, wind, sun, geothermal sources--and takes a look at where sustainable technology is headed.

Energy in Crisis
By Catherine Chambers, 2010.
Energy makes things work. From coal and wood to gas and oil, planet Earth has a wealth of natural resources packed full of energy. The way that energy is produced and the amount we use have a huge impact upon the planet. If people continue to use fuels at the current rate, the Earth will run out of its own resources. The effect on the environment will be devastating. This way of living is called unsustainable. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of human energy consumption and the ways in which people can reduce their impact on the environment by reducing their own energy consumption and using alternative renewable energy sources, such as solar power.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Eye Witness Science: Energy
By Jack Challoner.
Discover the amazing story of energy. From fire to creating electricity with fossil fuels to renewable energies such as wind and water.

Fuels and Energy
By Doug Kincaid & Peter Coles (1996)
An easy to read book that will introduce you to what energy is, fossil fuels, and alternative energy sources.

Fuel and Energy
By Steven Seldenberg (1992).
An introduction to energy sources, including fossil fuels and alternatives such as solar and wind. Recommended for grades 6 to 8.Fuels and Energy

Generating Wind Power
By Niki Walker, 2006.
People have been using the wind’s energy for thousands of years to travel, power machinery, generate electricity, and for agriculture. Generating Wind Power will teach young readers about the benefits of harnessing the wind for everyday use. This fascinating new book features full-color illustrations and photographs, as well as case studies from around the world. Topics include:

  • why we need wind energy
  • how electricity is made from the wind
  • wind farms and turbines
  • the history of wind power, from sailboats to windmills
  • where and how wind power is used today
  • the limitations of wind power

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Geothermal Energy: Using Earth’s Furnace
By Carrie Gleason, 2008.
The need for safe sources of renewable energy has sent scientists underground to tap the natural heat produced by the Earth. Geothermal Energy: Using Earth’s Furnace describes the three different ways electricity is produced from geothermal energy. Young readers will discover how this clean, safe energy is currently being used in twenty countries including the United States, the largest producer of geothermal energy.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Green Power
By David Jefferis, 2006.
Imagine living in a pollution- free city! The world needs power but the Earth's current sources of energy are destroying our environment. Our future depends on environmentally friendly energy and Green Power explores current research into such solutions as biofuels, wind, and solar energy. Green Energy explains:

  • how traditional dams use gravity to spin electric turbines
  • how ocean tides can be used to create energy
  • how heat from deep inside the Earth is used by some countries to heat homes and power lights
  • the amazing facts about how we can improve our energy consumption today

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Harnessing Power from the Sun
By Niki Walker, 2006.
The oldest and most important source of power for our planet is the Sun. This amazing new book tells why solar power is becoming a very real replacement for our current energy sources. Detailed images feature different types of solar collectors, solar thermal plants, and solar cells, and help explain how they are used. Special case studies identify areas where solar power is already in use around the world. Topics include:

  • a timeline and history of solar energy use
  • detailed diagrams that show how solar technologies work
  • the experiences of people who have taken themselves “off the grid”

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Hydroelectric Power: Power from Moving Water
By Marguerite Rodger, 2010.
Hydroelectricity is energy derived from the power of water in motion. Harnessing energy from water provides clean, available power that does not release harmful chemicals or carbons into the air. This interesting book focuses on the benefits and drawbacks of this energy source and explains how hydro turbines, transformers, and power lines work to bring light to the world. Easy-to-understand conservation tips give readers helpful suggestions on how to conserve electricity and become more environmentally conscious.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Hydrogen: Running On Water
By Niki Walker, 2006.
While it may not be as simple as pouring water into a gas tank, water, or at least the hydrogen that makes up water, will one day become a significant source of energy. In this important new book, children will discover not only what hydrogen is, but also how this simple element can create clean energy. Hydrogen’s past deals with hot air balloons and airships, its present, space shuttles and fuel cells. What fascinating technologies await its future? Other topics include:

  • What is energy?
  • the reasons why clean energy is so important
  • the technologies that convert hydrogen to useable energy
  • the obstacles that must be overcome before hydrogen can be a reliable energy source
  • a case study highlighting Iceland’s plan to switch to a society run on hydrogen
  • What is a “hydrogen economy”?
  • A timeline that provides dates for historical breakthroughs in energy production

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Is There a Future for Fossil Fuels?
By Ellen Rodger, 2010.
Natural gas, oil, and coal are finite resources, and their use contributes to deadly smog and global warming. The Future of Fossil Fuels follows the world's dependence on these resources and explains just what will happen when they run out. Special case studies highlight how people are working to reduce the use of fossil fuels and even make them more environmentally friendly.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Nuclear Energy: Power from the Atom
By Troon Harrison Adams, 2010.
Global warming has forced countries around the world to invest in alternative energy sources. With this rethinking, nuclear energy is getting a second look—even from die-hard environmentalists. This important book discusses the benefits and drawbacks of this controversial, but clean and reliable, source of power. Case studies show how nuclear energy can be made safer and how new technologies are addressing some old concerns.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Nuclear Legacy: Students of Two Atomic Cities
Edited by Maureen McQuerry and Tetiana Havrysh, 2000.
Essays written by teenagers from two communities: Richland, WA, where plutonium was processed for the Manhattan Project; and Slavutych, Ukraine, site of much of the devastation of the Chornobyl nuclear power plant disaster in 1986. The essays cover the history of each town, the development of nuclear power and warfare, and the secrecy involved in having family members working in this industry.

Ocean, Tidal, and Wave Energy: Power from the Sea
By Lynn Peppas, 2008.
The natural movement of water has long been used to create energy. New forms of hydropower are being researched as alternative ways to create clean renewable energy. This remarkable new book describes how water flow is being used in tidal and wave energy farms, and how the oceans contain enough heat in the surface water to power the world! Case studies highlight the potential advantages and disadvantages of pursuing these different kinds of power.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-5; Ages 8-10)

Pass the Energy, Please!
By Barbara Shaw McKinney and Chad Wallace, 2000.
The author presents the ecological food chain in a rhyming story. The illustrations, done in oil paints, are large and colourful, showing fine details of birds, mammals, insects, and plants in their natural surroundings.

Protecting Our Planet: Fuels for the Future
By Steve Parker (1998).
An interesting look at where our energy comes from now (fossil fuels) and the direction it is taking for the future (renewables).

Save Energy
By Kay Barnham, 2007.
Saving energy is essential to making our world a cleaner place to live. By reducing our use of fossil fuels and switching to renewable sources of energy, we can reduce pollution and slow down damaging climate change. This new book explores different sources of energy, how we use it, and how this affects the environment. It is also full of ideas for saving energy at home and at school, and encourages children to take an active part in preserving the environment and their future.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Primary

Children of the Earth...Remember
By Schim Schimmel, 1997.
Through his exquisite paintings and moving words Schim Schimmel lovingly tells the story of the one big family of Mother Earth. It is a tender lesson of sharing and protecting our planet. Although Children of the Earth... Remember was created with young readers in mind, adults will also find this beautiful story and its unique and powerful artwork irresistible.

Dear Children of the Earth
By Schim Schimmel, 1994.
So begins a remarkable letter from Mother Earth asking for help from children everywhere. She writes to express her love for each and every child and asks for their love and appreciation in return. In all of children’s literature there is no message more tender and meaningful that this “letter from Home.” In her own words, and with all of her heart, Mother Earth enfolds children with love and entrusts them with her protection. Hers is a message for today and forever.

Different Kinds of Soil
By Molly Aloian, 2010.
Different Kinds of Soil will help children understand the composition of soil, its layers, and what organic and inorganic matter is found in soil. Comparisons of soil particles help describe different types of soil, soils from different climates, how soil type affects plant and animal life, and the value of fertile soil.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Forests & Jungles
Grasslands & Deserts
By Gail Radley and Jean Sherlock, 2001.
The introduction, which is the same in both books, summarizes what happens to the animals as their habitats are threatened. In Forests, Radley talks about Oahu tree snails, which live only on the Hawaiian island and are fast losing their tree homes to development. In Grasslands, she discusses the Utah prairie dog, which ranchers poisoned because it was a nuisance to their cattle.

Habitats: Grasslands
By Julia Waterlow, 1996.
What makes grassland habitats special? As you turn pages filled with pictures, you'll discover grassland communities from the Canadian Prairies to the African Savanna.

How is Soil Made?
By Heather L. Montgomery, 2010.
How Is Soil Made introduces the organic and inorganic components of soil; discusses plants need for nutrients, nutrient cycles, and decomposition; illustrates the weathering, erosion, deposition processes; and, concludes with why humans need to safeguard soil.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Micro Life in Soil
By Natalie Hyde, 2010.
Young readers will be astounded by the dynamic life in soil. This fascinating book describes why these often unseen organisms live in earth, what their ecological roles are, and how some must make adaptations to live there. Children will learn the value of even the smallest bacteria, understand the critical role that each organism plays, and be amazed by the impact that soil degradation has on an entire ecosystem.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Soil Erosion and How to Prevent It
By Natalie Hyde, 2010.
Soil Erosion and How to Prevent It helps young readers comprehend the impact of erosion on all life. This title addresses the value of soil, how soil is created, weathering, erosion, deposition, soil pollutants, natural versus human-induced erosion, impact on plants and animals, causes of erosion, and kid-friendly steps to preventing erosion.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Your Food
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
What kind of food do you eat? Do you choose food that is good for you, or only by what tastes good? Your Food invites readers to take a look at the food they eat and learn how to make healthy decisions. Case studies and step-by-step activities help readers to get really involved in the issues.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Junior

A Handful of Dirt
By Bial Raymond, 2000.
This readable, informative text introduces dirt dwellers from the tiniest protozoans through myriad invertebrates to the mammals and reptiles whose burrows aerate the earth, all depicted in large, sharp, full-color photos. The author includes basic instructions for setting up a home compost heap, and urges his audience to feel the same reverence for the soil and growing things as he does.

Changing Planet: What is the environmental impact of human migration and settlement?
By Sally Morgan, 2010.
This interesting book examines how human migration and settlement has affected planet Earth. From the earliest times humans have shaped and changed the landscape. The book will provide many historical and modern-day examples of changes to our planet caused by migration and settlement. As people need more land for farming and to build towns and cities, natural habitats and wilderness areas are destroyed. In countries such as India and China the urbanization of the population and the rapid growth of cities is creating pollution problems and adding to the problem of carbon emissions that are causing climate change. The growth of transport infrastructure between our “settlements” has made the daily migration of commuting easier, another contributor to increasing carbon emissions.

(Reading Level: Gr. 6; Ages 10-11)

Wetlands
By Pamala Hickman and Judy Shore, 1993
Discover wetlands by doing lots of projects and experiments about these wet 'n' wild habitats.

Biomes of the World: Temperate Forest
By Elizabeth Kaplan, 1996.
Explore the temperate forests of North America and around the world.

The Case of the Monkeys That Fell From the Trees: And Other Mysteries in Tropical Nature
By Susan E Quinlan, 2003.
Scientists are the sleuths in these 12 ecological mysteries set in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Each chapter describes a puzzling natural phenomenon and details the research conducted to explain it. For example, in the title study, a biologist investigates the sudden death of seven apparently healthy howling monkeys

Illustrated Natural History of Canada: The Pacific Coast
By Fred Bodsworth, 1975.
With lots of photos and maps this book will take you on a journey of the natural history of Canada's west coast.

Journey to the Top of the World
By Janet Foster, 1996.
Travel along with photographers Janet Foster and her husband John from Canada's east coast to the high Arctic as they go on assignment taking pictures of the wildlife they see along the way.

Taiga
By April Pulley Sayre, 1994.
Discover the climate, geology, plants and animals that live in the largest land biome on Earth -- the Taiga, also known as the boreal forest.

Temperate Deciduous Forests
By April Pulley Sayre, 1994.
Discover the weather, climate, plants and animals of the temperate deciduous forest.

Tundra
By April Pulley Sayre, 1994.
Discover the climate, geology, plants, animals and environmental problems of the biome that caps the Earth -- the Arctic Tundra.

The Vanishing Feast: How Dwindling Genetic Diversity Threatens the World's Food Supply
By Dorothy Hinshaw Patent, 1994.
Patent clearly explains the process of genetic engineering and how it threatens the small farmer, the environment, thousands of life forms, and the world's food supply. She stresses the importance of natural diversity in order for species to survive year after year under varying conditions and discusses current efforts to preserve it, including seed banks, rare livestock ranches, and gardening organizations.

What is a Biome?
By Bobbie Kalman, 1998.
Do you know what a "biome" is? As you turn the pages of this book you'll learn about biomes from all over the world -- from deserts to grasslands to the Arctic tundra. Full of cool wildlife photos.

Primary

A New True Book: Polar Bears
By Emilie Lepthien, 1991.
What is a polar bear? Where do they live? Read this book and you'll find out. You will also discover what people are doing to help polar bears and what the future might hold for these big white bears. Photos on every page!

The Arctic Habitat
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
An Arctic Habitat provides children with an introduction to this cold, vast region. Easy-to-read text and colourful photographs help children learn about this unique habitat and how the plants and animals have adapted to the harsh environment. Young readers will learn about

  • the characteristics of both land and water habitats in the Arctic
  • the plants and animals that live in the Arctic
  • how animals find food and shelter in the Arctic

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

Junior

Canadian Arctic Animals
By Colleayn O. Mastin. Illustrated by Jan Sovak, 1994.
Meet the animals of Canada's Arctic: muskox, lemmings, polar bears, walrus, arctic foxes and more.

Caribou Nature's Children: Caribou
By Judy Ross, 1986.
Meet and learn about the Woodland and Barren-ground caribou of Canada. Lots of cool photographs!

Illustrated Natural History of Canada: The Arctic Coast
By Douglas Wilkinson, 1970.
With lots of photos and maps this book lets you explore the natural history of Canada's Arctic coast.

Polar Bears Nature's Children: Polar Bears
By Caroline Greenland, 1986.
Open this book and you'll find yourself in polar bear country. With lots of photos, you'll learn all kinds of things about these amazing animals.

Remarkable Animals: The Caribou
By Lorle K. Harris, 1988.
Look at lots of photographs as you discover the things that make caribou such amazing animals.

Tundra: The Arctic Land
By Bruce Hiscock, 1986.
Learn about life in the Arctic. Through words and drawings, discover the people, the plants and the animals that call the Arctic home.

Primary

The Adventures of an Aluminum Can: A Story about Recycling
By Allison Inches, 2009.
Peek into this diary of an aluminum can as it goes on a journey from inside a bauxite rock, to the manufacturing line, to the store shelf, to a display on a bookshelf, to a garbage can, and finally to a recycling plant where it emerges into its new life?as a baseball bat! This 8x8 paperback storybook is told from the point of view of an enthusiastic aluminum can. The diary entries are fun and humorous, yet point out the ecological significance behind each product and the resources used to make it.

Garbage and Recycling
By Rosie Harlow, 2002.
Explaining the difference between biodegradable and non-biodegradable garbage, this book shows how glass, metal, and wool can be easily recycled. How Can I Help? boxes give suggestions for the young environmentalist who wants to recycle at home.

Living Green: A Turtle’s Quest for a Cleaner Planet
By Artie Knapp, 2011.
A determined turtle named Thurman shows us all that following your heart and doing what you believe in, no matter what others say, can make a difference. Tired of seeing the land he loves cluttered with trash, Thurman the turtle decides it’s time to take action.

Michael Recycle
By Ellie Bethel, Alexandra Colombo, 2008.
Just in time for Earth Day on April 22, Michael Recycle tells the adventures of a young superhero whose power allows him to teach people about recycling. After cleaning up a town, the people declare: “To Michael Recycle! The green-caped crusader, our super-green hero, the planet’s new savior!”

Pollution and Waste
By Rosie Harlow, 2002.
This book provides an overview of the many varied sources of pollution -- from smog and acid rain to chemical pesticides and everyday litter. It also covers the greenhouse effect, the hole in the ozone layer, and water and noise pollution, and suggests ways of dealing with them.

Re-Cycles
By Michael Elsohn Ross, 2002.
In this picture book, children learn the natural cycles of soil and water as well as the human-assisted one of composting. The process of composting, from garbage to soil to nutritious food and back again, encourages readers to think about how to reuse items rather than discard them.

Recycling
By Dr. Mike Goldsmith, 2009.
What is composting? Where should you put your garbage? Why do we need to recycle? Recycling gets children thinking about why recycling is important and what they can do to help, and how they can encourage their parents and others to help, too.

(Reading Level: Gr. K-1; Ages 4-6)

Reduce and Reuse
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
Before you throw anything away, you should always think about whether you could reduce the waste you make. Reduce and Reuse explores ways for readers to turn old things into new things, creating as little waste as possible.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

The Three R’s: Reuse, Reduse, Recycle
By Nuria Roca, Rosa M Curto, 2007.
The three R’s teaches us many things we can do to reduce pollution. When we Reduce the number of different things we throw away—such as plastic bags—we help to keep the land where we live clean and the water that we drink fresh. It is also a good idea to Reuse; for example, by finding new uses for hand-me-downs that we might otherwise be tempted to throw away. And we can Recycle things like paper, cans, and bottles by placing them in collection areas where they can be picked up and made into new and useful things. Remembering these three R words is a good way for us to help make our planet a good place to live.

Waste and Recycling
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
If you can’t reuse something, don’t just throw it away! In Waste and Recycling, Green Team members learn how important it is to recycle and send as little garbage to the landfill as possible.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

What Rot: Nature’s Mighty Recycler
By Elizabeth Ring, 1996.
Ring briefly describes how various bacteria, fungi, mosses, lichen, birds, mammals, insects, and other invertebrates feed upon and break down plant and animal material until it becomes part of the soil, enriching it with important nutrients.

Where Does Garbage Go?
By Paul Showers, 1994.
Follow that garbage truck!...to the landfill to see how trash keeps piling up...to the incinerator to see how trash can be turned into energy...to the recycling center to see how a soda bottle can be turned into a flowerpot. Filled with graphs, charts, and diagrams, Where Does the Garbage Go? explains how we deal with the problem of too much trash and provides ideas for easy ways to be a part of the solution.

Junior

The Adventures of a Little Plastic Bottle: A Story about Recycling (Little Green Book)
By Allison Inches, 2009
Learn about recycling from a new perspective!  Peek into this diary of a plastic bottle as it goes on a journey from the refinery plant, to the manufacturing line, to the store shelf, to a garbage can, and finally to a recycling plant where it emerges into it's new life...as a fleece jacket!  Told from the point of view of a free-spirited plastic bottle, kids can share in the daily experiences and inner thoughts of the bottle through his personal journal. The diary entries will be fun and humorous yet point out the ecological significance behind each product and the resources used to make it. Readers will never look at a plastic bottle the same way again!

How on Earth Do We Recycle Paper?
By Helen Jill Fletcher and Seli Groves, 1992.
Two books in which students are encouraged to get personally involved in recycling through school and community programs, and to be creative recyclers through craft projects. Activities listed have step-by-step instructions with clearly labeled diagrams.

Oil Spill!
By Melvin Berger; Illustrated by Paul Microcha, 2006.
Berger introduces children to the causes of oil spills, the ecological damage they cause, and the ideas and technologies developed to deal with them. The book ends with suggestions for preventing oil spills, from conserving energy at home to letter writing campaigns.

Our Endangered Planet: Atmosphere
By Mary King Hoff & Mary M. Rodgers, 1995.
A general overview of how atmospheric gases affect Earth and how the actions of people are changing the atmosphere's composition. The authors cover ozone depletion, the greenhouse effect, global warming, and international efforts related to solving such threats, as well as provide suggestions as to what individuals can do.

The Nature and Science of Waste
By Jane Burton and Kim Taylor, 1999.
In two-page chapters, this book identifies the different types of natural waste produced in the world. This book will interest children by illustrating how leaf litter, dead wood, and animal castoffs are used in nature.

Pollution: Problems and Solutions
By The National Wildlife Federation, 1998.
This book illustrates that, by studying the effect of toxins on wildlife, understanding the societal problems posed by pollution, and participating in recycling and clean-up projects, kids can become proactive in preserving the future of our planet.

Recycle
By Kay Barnham, 2007.
Recycling materials is the easiest way for everyone, even kids, to get involved in saving the planet. This new book explores how our garbage is processed, the problems it creates for the environment, and how we can change that. Children are encouraged to take an active part in preserving and caring for the environment through a multitude of ideas for recycling paper, glass, plastics, and other common materials at home and at school.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Intermediate

Space Junk: Pollution Beyond the Earth
By Judy Donnelly and Sydelle Kramer, 1990.
Space junk--fallen-away parts of rockets, non-functional satellites, and litter left by astronauts-- is orbiting the planet. This book outlines such problems as waste crashing to Earth as well as the existence of radioactive gases in Earth's atmosphere. The book addresses the potential dangers to people and touches upon some of the solutions being studied to eliminate these dangers.

Primary

The ABC’s of Oceans
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Did you know that a tiny sea jelly the size of your fingernail can kill a person? Oceans are filled with some of the most colourful creatures alive and some of the deadliest! Young children will be thrilled by the animals featured in this exciting ABC book which identifies everything under the sea, from colourful nudibranchs, sea cucumbers, and clownfish to deadly electric eels, stingrays, great white sharks, and sea jellies.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Earth’s Oceans
By Bobbie Kalman & Kelley MacAulay, 2008.
This magnificent new book uses beautiful photography to help young children understand why some oceans are warm and some are cold, which kinds of plants and animals live in oceans, and how the bodies of ocean animals are built to help them glide through water. Children will be delighted by the images of seals, penguins, polar bears, dolphins, and more.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Earth’s Rivers
By Bobbie Kalman, 2008.
Why do people need rivers? What causes rivers to flood? These are just a few of the questions answered by this fascinating introduction to rivers by Bobbie Kalman. Topics include the path of rivers, how rivers carve through rocks, waterfalls, headwaters, and tributaries estuaries, deltas and fiords types of rivers, river plants and animals, people and rivers, and famous rivers.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Saving Water and Energy
By Philip Steele, 2009.
What is renewable energy? Why do we need to save water? What is climate change? Saving Water and Energy motivates students to think about the energy and water they use, where it comes from, and why they need to do all they can to reduce the amount they use. Clearly labelled photographic imagery and simple diagrams explain all the different concepts involved.

(Reading Level: Gr. K-1; Ages 4-6)

Using Water
By Sally Hewitt, 2008.
With more people on Earth needing water, every drop counts! Join the Green Team in the exciting new title Using Water, and learn how to conserve water through fun exercises and thought-provoking tutorials.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

Junior

Destroying the Oceans
By Sarah Levete, 2010.
Oceans and seas are habitats for millions of animals and plants. Life on land depends on the oceans. Sea creatures provide food for billions of people around the world. The waters of the oceans shape the weather, the land, and the planet’s temperature. But human activity is endangering some of the world’s most unique habitats. Warmer ocean temperatures due to climate change are affecting food webs both in the water and on land, and may be responsible for an increase in the number of damaging storms around the planet. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of the destruction of ocean habitats and their wildlife and the ways in which people can reduce their impact on these life-giving bodies of water.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Save Water
By Kay Barnham, 2007.
In many parts of the world, the supply of clean, safe drinking water is running low. This important book explores where the water we use comes from, how water can become polluted, and why we should save water. Tips on saving water at home and at school encourage kids to think about conservation and caring for our environment.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Primary

The ABC’s of Animals
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Numbats, opossums, planigales and quolls, not to mention marsupial moles! Are some of the more unusual animals featured in this engaging and highly illustrated ABC book. The imaginative and playful text will capture a child's interest in these strange animals as well as other more familiar favourites, from butterflies to elephants.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The ABC’s of Endangered Animals
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009.
Bobbie Kalman presents some of the most endangered animals on Earth: rhinos, bats, butterflies, penguins, gorillas, monk seals, komodo dragons, and tigers, to name just a few. This beautifully photographed volume also explains the various classifications of endangerment, as well as the major reasons why some animals are facing extinction.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The ABC’s of Habitats
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Habitats are the natural places where plants and animals live. Deserts, forests, oceans, ponds, grasslands, polar regions, and mountains - this book introduces them all to young children. Fabulous photographs highlight this valuable learning resource. Children will be inspired to write their own ABCs after reading this book.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The ABC’s of Insects
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009.
Earth has more than a million species of insects! There are helpful insects, harmful insects, flying insects, insects that work together, endangered insects, and some really weird insects! This fun book with great photographs will delight children and encourage them to identify insects in their world. It will also give them information to write their own books about insects!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

The ABC’s of Plants
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Children will love learning about plants and plant parts. Beautiful photographs and artwork in this spectacular ABC book help teach children to identify various plants and find similar examples in their own communities.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Animals without backbones
By Bobbie Kalman, 2008.
More than 98% of Earth’s animals are invertebrates. Invertebrates do not have backbones or internal skeletons, but some have hard coverings. Insects, spiders, worms, snails, and most ocean animals are invertebrates. Invertebrates are weird and wonderful creatures that come in every shape and color imaginable! Children will love the exciting photos!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Backyard Habitats
By Kelley MacAulay & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
A Backyard Habitat takes children on a journey through their own back yards and teaches them about the many living things that are leading fascinating lives all around them. This informative book uses easy-to-read text to help children learn about the variety of plants and animals that survive in backyard habitats. Young readers will discover:

  • backyard food chains
  • how migration and hibernation affect the animals living in a back yard at different times of the year
  • how animals make homes in back yards

(Reading Level: Gr. 1-2; Ages 5-7)

A Desert Habitat
By Kelley MacAulay & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
The desert is a habitat of extreme climate that provides plants and animals with unique survival challenges. A Desert Habitat provides an introduction to one of the world’s most fascinating desert habitats: the Sonoran Desert. More plants and animals live in the Sonoran Desert than in any other desert on Earth. A Desert Habitat uses simple language and large, full-color images to teach children about:

  • the weather in the Sonoran Desert
  • how Sonoran Desert plants perform photosynthesis
  • how animals find food, keep cool, and stay alive

(Reading Level: Gr. 1-2; Ages 5-7)

A Forest Habitat
By Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
Young readers will be delighted to learn all about temperate mixed forests, which are filled with a wide variety of interesting plants and animals. A Forest Habitat explains, in easy-to-understand language, how the habitat changes as the seasons change. Full-color pictures and illustrations also help teach children about:

  • finding food in forests
  • forest homes
  • hibernation and migration

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

Forest Mammals
By Bobbie Kalman & Glen Loates, 1987.
Glen Loates' stunning illustrations add to this profile of forest mammals which encourages children to respect nature and wildlife.

A Grassland Habitat
By Kelley MacAulay & Bobbie Kalman, 2006
An amazing multitude of living things thrive in grasslands, such as prairies. In A Grassland Habitat, children will learn about the many kinds of plants and animals that make their homes in prairies. This intriguing book looks at the ways plants and animals are perfectly suited to prairie grasslands. Topics include:

  • prairie weather and how animals survive during droughts
  • an investigation of prairie animals that build complex underground homes
  • how animals stay safe in prairies, where there are few places to hide

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

How do animals communicate?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009
Animals cannot use words to talk to one another, but they have many ways of communicating! Birds sing and dance, monkeys and some other mammals have warning cries, and cats and other animals use scent to mark their territories. Insects and some frogs use warning coloration to fool predators, and many kinds of animals use body language to warn other animals or show them affection. Some primates and dolphins are even able to communicate using sentences or more complex instructions. In How do animals communicate?, young readers will learn all of the fascinating ways that animals ‘talk’ to each other!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

In The Woods
By P. Hickman, 1998.
This book is packed with great ideas to help young naturalists explore life in the woods.

Insect Eaters
By Bobbie Kalman, 2008.
Many animals are carnivores, but some eat mainly insects. Insect eaters, known as insectivores, can be as small as insects or as large as giant anteaters. Spiders, frogs, lizards, bats, and other mammals are insect eaters, but not all insectivores are animals. This book is loaded with fascinating photos and information that will delight kids of all ages.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Land Habitat
By Bobbie Kalman & John Crossingham, 2006.
This book teaches young readers about the different types of Land Habitats. Mountains, deserts, grasslands, forests, and wetlands are just some of the many habitats discussed in a way that children will easily understand. This book also explains:

  • the weather in each habitat
  • the different types of vegetation in each habitat
  • the different types of animals in each habitat

(Reading Level: Gr. 1-2; Ages 5-7)

Nature’s Cleaners
By Bobbie Kalman, 2008.
All living things die. Fortunately, nature has “cleaners” that eat decomposing things. Scavengers, detrivores, and decomposers are three groups of living things that use the leftover energy in things that have died. From hyenas and vultures eating carcasses, to mushrooms feeding on rotting wood, to dung beetles rolling in animal waste, this book has it all in vivid color!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Plants and Us
By Angela Royston, 2001.
A wonderful book for early elementary-aged children introducing the myriad of ways plants are used around us. Thirty-two short pages with big colourful photographs cover topics ranging from medicinal herbs to cosmetics, food, and toys.

The Prince of Butterflies
By Bruce Coville, Illustrated by: John Clapp, 2002.
When 11-year-old John finds thousands of monarch butterflies have returned from their migration, he learns through their myriad voices that they are in danger of losing their migratory location. They plead to John for his help when they discover a mall may be built on the location.

A Rainforest Habitat
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006
A Rainforest Habitat introduces children to the huge trees, colourful flowers, and other plants in South American tropical rain forests. This fascinating book also outlines the insects, amphibians, mammals, and other animals that live there. Captivating photographs and easy-to-follow text help young readers understand

  • the climate in a rainforest
  • the different plants and animals in a rainforest
  • how animals find food and shelter in rainforests

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

A Savanna Habitat
By Bobbie Kalman & Rebecca Sjonger, 2006
The grasslands of Africa are home to some of the most interesting plants and animals in the world. A Savanna Habitat uses beautiful photographs, detailed illustrations, and clear language to teach young readers all about this amazing habitat. This book teaches children about:

  • the small and huge animals that graze on the grasses
  • the carnivores found in the savanna and how they hunt
  • how animals find food, water, and shelter on the savanna

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

Slippery Babies: Young Frogs, Toads & Salamanders
By Ginny Johnston & Judy Cutchins, 1991
Learn how baby frogs, toads and salamanders live and grow.

Tree in the Ancient Forest
By Carol Reed-Jones, Illustrated by Christopher Canyon, 1995.
Structured like "This is the House that Jack Built," this environmental rhyme aims to show the interdependence of living things within the ancient forests.

Underground Habitats
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
Young readers will be fascinated to learn about the activity going on under their very feet. Underground Habitats takes a look at the diverse and exciting array of plants and animals that make their homes under ground. Straightforward text, along with detailed illustrations and vivid photographs, teach children all about this fascinating habitat. Specific topics include:

  • underground vegetation
  • animal homes under ground
  • the weather’s effects on underground habitats

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

Warm-blooded or cold-blooded
By Bobbie Kalman, 2008.
Although these terms are used to describe various types of animals, neither term is actually accurate. This book makes a complicated subject easy to understand. Through captivating photographs, Bobbie Kalman shows how some animals regulate their body temperatures in different ways, such as by shivering or panting, flapping their wings, or swimming in different parts of oceans. Topics include how each type of animal is suited to its environment, how some animals use behaviour to control their body temperatures, and how animals avoid overheating or heat loss.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Water Habitats
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.
Water Habitats features breathtaking photographs, detailed illustrations, and text that is easy to read, yet comprehensive. Young readers will enjoy learning about the different types of water habitats, including oceans, lakes, rivers, and swamps. This book also discusses

  • the differences between saltwater habitats and freshwater habitats
  • plant and animal life in each water habitat
  • how animals find food and protect themselves

(Reading Level: Gr. 1; Ages 5-6)

A Wetland Habitat
By Molly Aloian & Bobbie Kalman, 2006.z
Wetlands are found all over North America. They are a vibrant habitat for thousands of plant and animal species. Stunning, colourful photographs and clear, concise language help teach children about A Wetland Habitat. Specific topics include:

  • which plants and animals live in wetlands
  • finding food in wetlands
  • how weather affects wetlands

(Reading Level: Gr. 1-2; Ages 5-7)

What is a Carnivore?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Carnivores are animals that eat other animals. This clearly written book uses detailed images to look at insect, fish, frog, reptile, arthropod, and mammal carnivores and how they hunt or find their food. It also explains terms such as predator and prey and introduces the basics of a food chain.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3-4; Ages 7-9)

What is a Herbivore?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007
Herbivores eat plants, but they don't eat the same kinds of plants or plant parts. This captivating book looks at animals that eat grass, leaves, flowers, cacti, fruit, pollen and nectar, and wood. Amazing photographs also feature animals, such as koalas and pandas which eat very specialized plant foods such as eucalyptus leaves and bamboo.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

What is a Omnivore?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007
Omnivores will never go hungry because they will eat almost anything. Also called opportunistic feeders, these animals eat both plant and animal foods. Children will love learning from this book filled with fabulous photos and fascinating text. Well-known omnivores include bears and raccoons. These animals raid garbage cans and campsites. Less well-known omnivores are many insects, birds, and people.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

What is a Vertebrate?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2007.
Animals with backbones are called vertebrates. This amazing book allows young readers to peek inside an animal and understand its body structure from the inside out. Detailed illustrations of each animal's skeleton help show how different kinds of vertebrates move.

(Reading Level: Gr. 3; Ages 7-8)

What senses do animals have?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009
Did you know that worker bees have more than 5,000 lenses in each eye and dragonflies have more than 30,000? Did you know a chameleon can move each of its eyes in opposite directions? This fascinating book will thrill children with facts, such as how crickets hear with their legs, how bats and dolphins use echolocation, how elephants hear low-frequency sounds, and how sharks use their lateral line for sensing movement in water. Other topics include animals that can sense ultraviolet and infrared light, temperature changes, and smells, and those that are able to detect magnetic fields. This book, illustrated with magnificent photographs, is more interesting than a science-fiction novel!

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Why do animals migrate?
By Bobbie Kalman, 2009
Autumn is the time that many birds fly to places with warmer climates. Spring signals their return trip. Many birds migrate to keep warm and to find food that is not available in their winter homes. Not all migration is seasonal, however. Animals that graze, such as wildebeests, zebras, and antelopes, migrate in huge herds of millions of animals to find water and new plants to eat. There are also animals, such as humpback whales, sea turtles, and salmon, which migrate to reproduce. This book, containing fabulous photographs, will bring migrating animals, the navigational tools they use, and the challenges they face, to life for children.

(Reading Level: Gr. 2-3; Ages 6-8)

Junior

Ahmed and the Nest of Sand
By Kristin and Jeff Domm, 2000.
Having moved to Nova Scotia from Kuwait because of war, Ahmed now lives in an apartment and misses many things about his home, especially the exotic birds that were raised behind his house. When members of the Piping Plover Guardian Program come to talk to his class about their efforts to save these endangered shore birds, Ahmed decides to devote his spare time and energy to the cause.

All About the Frog
By William White, 1992.
What do frogs eat? How do they find food? Where do they live? What will happen to frogs in the future? You'll find out, as frogs leap right off the pages at you from colourful photos.

Amphibians
By Dr. Barry Clarke and Laura Buller, 2005.
Learn about all kinds of amazing amphibians, from the inside out.

Eclectic Guide to Trees
By Glen Blouin, 2001.
This excellent guide for educators and outdoor enthusiasts goes beyond the basics to explore the broader significance of trees.

DK Eyewitness Books: “Ecology”
By Brian Lane & Steve Pollock, 2005.
Here is a spectacular, thought-provoking, and highly informative guide to the fascinating story of ecology. Superb color photographs of animals, plants, and ecosystems reveal the ideas and discoveries that have changed our understanding of life around us. See how plants store their food supply, how dung enriches the soil, how biodiversity is measured, the damage caused by acid rain, and a field-digger wasp capturing a fly. Learn how plants create their own food, how and when the world's human population "exploded," and how your backyard provides a small-scale model of life all over the Earth. Discover the links in the seashore food chain, how the buffalo was saved from extinction, why insects such as locusts are subject to population explosion, and much, much more!

(Reading Level: Gr. 4-8; Ages 8-14)

The Frog and the Toad
By Mike Linley, 1990.
Can you tell the difference between a frog and a toad? You will! Discover how they move in water and on land; What they eat; How they don't get eaten; And much, much more!

Frogs
By Gail Gibbons, 1993.
Learn about the amazing world of frogs.

  • How their bodies change as they grow from tadpoles to frogs.
  • How they make sounds and what the different frog calls mean
  • How they hibernate when it's cold.

Frogs
By James Martin, 1997
Follow the incredible story of frogs as they change from tadpole to adult. Follow frogs through history. See what frogs might be telling us about the future.

Frogs and Toads
By Steve Parker, 1994.
Jump with amazement as you learn where these amazing amphibians live, how they hunt, how they protect themselves and how they grow from eggs to tadpoles to frogs. Unfold special pages to see how a frog swims, leaps and hides from enemies.

Habitats and Wildlife in Danger
By Sarah Levete, 2010.
Habitats provide the environment in which animals and plants can thrive. This variety of living things is crucial to our survival providing us with such necessities as foods and medicines. However, human activity is upsetting the natural balance of the environment. Clearing land to grow crops, pollution from industry, and farming damages habitats at a quick pace and threatens the survival of wildlife. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of the destruction of habitats and their wildlife and the ways in which people can reduce their impact on these homes in nature.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

It's a Frog's Life
By Densey Clyne, 1998.
Explore the lives of frogs - in water, on land and underground. There's lots of wicked froggy photos.

Journey Through a Tropical Jungle
By Adrian Forsyth, 1988.
Forsyth, a biologist, takes the reader on a trip to the Monteverde Reserve in Costa Rica as he writes about the abundant and increasingly threatened plant, animal and insect life of that magnificent rain forest.

Living Things We Love to Hate
By Des Kennedy, 2002.
The author has selected 20 creatures that are "hated" for one reason or another and has assembled fact, folklore, and anecdotes about each into a breezy compendium that invites us to reconsider our relationship with nature.

Save The Earth
By Betty Miles, 1991.
An overview of the environmental problems of land, atmosphere, water, energy, plants, animals, and people. Includes projects and a section on becoming an environmental activist.

Secrets of the Animal World: Frogs Living in Two Worlds
By Andreu Llamas, 1997
Learn some cool secrets of the frog world.

The Skies
By Gail Radley and Jean Sherlock, 1998.
Each chapter provides basic facts and short poems about ten animals from various parts of the world and outlines the threats to their survival. Conservation efforts and results are noted, but the impact of human destruction of habitat continues to compromise long-term survival prospects for most of the creatures.

Threatened Wetlands
By Catherine Chambers, 2010.
Wetland habitats are full of wildlife. They help control flooding and absorb greenhouse gases that are making the atmosphere of the Earth hotter. However, half the world’s wetlands have been destroyed over the last one hundred years, mostly through human activity and climate change. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of the destruction of our wetlands and the ways in which people can reduce their impact on these vital habitats.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

Toxins in the Food Chain
By Sarah Levete, 2010.
Toxins are poisons. Many are found in nature and help protect plants and animals from animals that try to eat them. But there are other toxins that are very harmful, especially when they enter the food chain. Artificial chemicals such as herbicides and pesticides used in farming, cleaning products used by industries, hormones injected into animals, all get passed along to living things through the food chain with devastating effects. This fascinating book uses case studies to explore the causes and effects of the toxins in our food chain and the ways in which people can reduce their own toxic pollution by using more natural products.

(Reading Level: Gr. 4; Ages 8-9)

The Wind in the Willows
By Kenneth Grahame, 1966
Follow along on the adventures of Mr. Toad in this classic children's book. This is something to hang on to so your kids can read it too.

Wetlands
By Pamala Hickman and Judy Shore, 1993
Discover wetlands by doing lots of projects and experiments about these wet 'n' wild habitats.

Animals of the Rain Forest
By Stephen Savage, 1997.

The Canadian Junior Green Guide
By T. Degler, 1990.

Conserving the Jungles
By L. Williams, 1989.

Rain Forests
By Philip Sauvain, 1996.

The Secrets of Trees
By Ann Reilly , 1991.

Trees of the World
By David Lambert, 1985.

Intermediate

Ecosystems Animals Around the World
By Robin Kerrod, 1992.
Great wildlife photos! Discover animals from around the world:

  • How they survive in their different habitats
  • Which animals live in the world's different biomes
  • How animals have adapted to their habitats
  • How some animals are in danger because they are losing their habitat

The Simple Act of Planting A Tree
By Tree People, 1990.
The guide explains such practical matters as what species to plant where and how to nurture young trees, but perhaps more importantly, it also provides case-study examples (from Southern California communities, in particular) of how tree-planting campaigns were started.

 

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